IT’S NEVER TO LATE TOO SAY “THANK YOU”

February 28th, 2011 by CASUDI


Over 25 years ago I sent several packages to a young mother in Poland, whom I had heard was having a difficult time finding clothes for her small children. I heard the packages had arrived, but not much more. Last week I received an email, which made me think it’s never to late to say ”Thank You.”

Dear Caroline,

I am sure you are surprised that I am writing – this is because I found your web site and could use a contact. You remember me for sure. I am your film partner’s daughter.

I want to tell you I am really very, very grateful for your help years ago. It was hard time in Poland and also in my life. You made the childhood of my children colourful and cheerful. They had beautiful clothes and toys, thanks to you. I appreciate you bought all things for us, despite you didn’t know us, you gave us your interest, time and money. Thank you very much, Caroline.

 

I would like you to know I think of you sometimes with warm feelings. Maybe I was too young and too stupid than to express my gratitude in a right way. I’m sorry. But I still remember. Even thought my children are grown up now, we still keep the raccoon toy and the most beautiful little velvet dress!


I also have a picture with your black Labrador dog Max. That breed wasn’t known in Poland than – they came in the eighties. We have two now- black and yellow.

My dog Max in the 1990s filming The Essence of Life TV series

I read on the Internet you are a successful woman, I am very happy for that.
Love,
Sylwia F


The original email didn’t come with the images….that was in her follow up. Amazing someone I have never met, found me on the internet after 25 years, and sent me such an amazing “Thank you.”

What “Thank you” should you have said, would have written or would still like to say? Please add them to the comments below. It’s never too late, and lets show Sylwia how she has inspired us all.

CASUDI

Building Bridges Between People Designing Success

@CASUDI on twitter

37 Responses to “IT’S NEVER TO LATE TOO SAY “THANK YOU””

  1. CathyWebSavvyPR Says:

    What a wonderful letter to receive. I should find and contact the family with whom I lived for a week in northern Greece during my Jr. year of college. Finding a family to live with, to get adopted for a week, was a part of the five-month program I was taking. It was an amazing experience to live with Yannis, the local math teacher who spoke some English then, and his parents in a tiny town called Exaplatanos. That experience of traveling on my own and putting my new Greek language lessons to work – taught me a lot about what I was able to accomplish; it built my self confidence. Although they wrote their info down, it was hard to for me to read the Greek letters/handwriting. I then lost the paper during my travels to England. I too was young, and didn’t really think the thank you through. I still speak basic Greek – and still have that seed of confidence that began on that trip. I will search for their info, perhaps online, and say the thank you I never sent, but should have years ago. Thanks for the inspiration.

  2. Jeanette Says:

    Thank you for sharing this inspiring story Caroline.

    I would like to tell my late daughter Sara “Thank you.” I told her I loved her over and over but I never told her thank you for teaching me how to love. I’d tell her thank you for teaching me patience, humility, and how to laugh.

    Besides telling someone you love them, tell them why you appreciate them. Don’t assume they know. You never know when you won’t have the opportunity to say Thank You.

  3. Jeanette Says:

    Thank you for sharing this inspiring story Caroline.

    I would like to tell my late daughter Sara “Thank you.” I told her I loved her over and over but I never told her thank you for teaching me how to love. I’d tell her thank you for teaching me patience, humility, and how to laugh.

    Besides telling someone you love them, tell them why you appreciate them. Don’t assume they know. You never know when you won’t have the opportunity to say Thank You.

  4. Lois Geller Says:

    This is a lovely story, Caroline. I adore the pictures of the beloved gifts you gave them…from your heart.
    I guess I wish I had more chance to say “Thank you” to my Dad. He taught me so many things, but mostly made my life happier because of his great sense of humor. Even at the end of his life, he would tell me stories of the pranks he pulled on my Mom, and wink cutely at me.
    He knew I loved him, but I don’t know if he realized the impact he had on my life, and how he saved me from an awful marriage, and always stood up for me.
    After he died, I was cleaning his closet and came across two huge scrapbooks. In them was every article I’ve written, newspaper stories about my promotions, programs where I was keynoting….hundreds of pages perfectly kept. It touched my heart.
    I wish I had told him “Thank you, Dad” for being the best father any girl ever had.

  5. Lois Geller Says:

    This is a lovely story, Caroline. I adore the pictures of the beloved gifts you gave them…from your heart.
    I guess I wish I had more chance to say “Thank you” to my Dad. He taught me so many things, but mostly made my life happier because of his great sense of humor. Even at the end of his life, he would tell me stories of the pranks he pulled on my Mom, and wink cutely at me.
    He knew I loved him, but I don’t know if he realized the impact he had on my life, and how he saved me from an awful marriage, and always stood up for me.
    After he died, I was cleaning his closet and came across two huge scrapbooks. In them was every article I’ve written, newspaper stories about my promotions, programs where I was keynoting….hundreds of pages perfectly kept. It touched my heart.
    I wish I had told him “Thank you, Dad” for being the best father any girl ever had.

  6. Brian Driggs Says:

    What a great story. Thank you for sharing, Casudi.

    Truly, borders and nationalities are merely suggestions. We are all human beings.

    Stories like this remind us of the importance of being human.

  7. Brian Driggs Says:

    What a great story. Thank you for sharing, Casudi.

    Truly, borders and nationalities are merely suggestions. We are all human beings.

    Stories like this remind us of the importance of being human.

  8. CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) Says:

    Cathy, please let us know when you find the family in Greece who were so hospitable to you those many years ago. I am anticipating an amazing ending.

    Jeanette, I know we don’t often say the things we should but at some level I am sure your daughter felt and knew them.

    Lois, it’s interesting how something like the scrapbook really brings home the caring….. have you ever thought that your accomplishments in print, were your “Thank you” to your dad?

    Brian, yes human to err but also human to make up for it and say “Thank you.”

    Valeria Maltoni said on twitter ~ “so moving. I may forget to say many things, “thank you” is the one thing I remember consistently. Very important to say.” Yes, my friend Valeria is always reminding us, and a continuing proponent of “Thank you” ~ Thank you Valeria.

    I’ve sent the link of this post to Sylwia, I wonder what she will say?

  9. CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) Says:

    Cathy, please let us know when you find the family in Greece who were so hospitable to you those many years ago. I am anticipating an amazing ending.

    Jeanette, I know we don’t often say the things we should but at some level I am sure your daughter felt and knew them.

    Lois, it’s interesting how something like the scrapbook really brings home the caring….. have you ever thought that your accomplishments in print, were your “Thank you” to your dad?

    Brian, yes human to err but also human to make up for it and say “Thank you.”

    Valeria Maltoni said on twitter ~ “so moving. I may forget to say many things, “thank you” is the one thing I remember consistently. Very important to say.” Yes, my friend Valeria is always reminding us, and a continuing proponent of “Thank you” ~ Thank you Valeria.

    I’ve sent the link of this post to Sylwia, I wonder what she will say?

  10. Sylwia Says:

    Thank you Caroline once more…
    I am really impressed you used that story to write the post about!
    And I am glad to see people’ reaction.
    Your help was very important to me and my family. All of us are grateful! Sad times in our country werent as sad thanks you:)
    You are absolutely right- it’s never too late…

  11. Sylwia Says:

    Thank you Caroline once more…
    I am really impressed you used that story to write the post about!
    And I am glad to see people’ reaction.
    Your help was very important to me and my family. All of us are grateful! Sad times in our country werent as sad thanks you:)
    You are absolutely right- it’s never too late…

  12. Chanelle Says:

    I think the true value of this is in that she remembered you and looked you up. That is a gift.

  13. Chanelle Says:

    I think the true value of this is in that she remembered you and looked you up. That is a gift.

  14. Pam Wilson Says:

    This is soooooo awesome Caroline and very encouraging…In fact today I got a check in the mail for my last pet sitting job and they sent me a really – really nice bonus with it..I sent them a email to let them know how much I really appreciated it…I have something coming up that I have to take care of and was wondering where the money was going to come from to pay for it and the bonus covers almost all of it.. :-) :-)
    Pam

  15. Pam Wilson Says:

    This is soooooo awesome Caroline and very encouraging…In fact today I got a check in the mail for my last pet sitting job and they sent me a really – really nice bonus with it..I sent them a email to let them know how much I really appreciated it…I have something coming up that I have to take care of and was wondering where the money was going to come from to pay for it and the bonus covers almost all of it.. :-) :-)
    Pam

  16. Lining Yao Says:

    It is amazing to receive such a letter! I would also like to say Thank you to you, Caroline:)

  17. Lining Yao Says:

    It is amazing to receive such a letter! I would also like to say Thank you to you, Caroline:)

  18. Mark Babbitt Says:

    Just incredible, Caroline.

    Just this past weekend I had a man drive up to the house. Not recognizing him, or his car, I approached carefully, wondering what this stranger wanted.

    Turned out this still-young man (now in his late 20s) was the running back on my football team a decade ago. He got out of the car, gave me a big hug, and said: “Coach, I didn’t appreciate you back then. I was a [jerk]. I have kids now, and now I get what you were trying to do back then. This is the first time I’ve come back to town since high school, and I had to come by, and say ‘Sorry’ and ‘Thank you.'”

    It is never too late to say either one, it seems. And I am thrilled you received that email 25 years later, and very happy you shared.

  19. Mark Babbitt Says:

    Just incredible, Caroline.

    Just this past weekend I had a man drive up to the house. Not recognizing him, or his car, I approached carefully, wondering what this stranger wanted.

    Turned out this still-young man (now in his late 20s) was the running back on my football team a decade ago. He got out of the car, gave me a big hug, and said: “Coach, I didn’t appreciate you back then. I was a [jerk]. I have kids now, and now I get what you were trying to do back then. This is the first time I’ve come back to town since high school, and I had to come by, and say ‘Sorry’ and ‘Thank you.'”

    It is never too late to say either one, it seems. And I am thrilled you received that email 25 years later, and very happy you shared.

  20. CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) Says:

    Sylwia, your story truly inspired many people, some who commented here, some who emailed me, and one person who called me on the phone. This is the power of sharing on the internet; and sharing globally

    Chanelle, I can really tell you are a writer ~ in one line you give us a whole paragraph’s worth. Thank you so much.

    Pam, it’s so nice to hear people giving that extra when they appreciate you. So often we take that extra for granted. Lois (who commented above) is a great advocate of letting people know when they do something well or extra; and not only let people know when you have a complaint!.Thank you for sharing.

    Yao, “Thank you” will be your success at MIT Media Lab and being a successful entrepreneur with your own company, whether here in the US or in China. I look forward to getting caught up with you on your next vacation……

    Mark, that is so appropriate….. I wonder how many of your many “teams” feel the same way and have effectively used and implemented much of what they have learned from you , but never actually taken the step to find you, and say “Thank you”

  21. CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) Says:

    Sylwia, your story truly inspired many people, some who commented here, some who emailed me, and one person who called me on the phone. This is the power of sharing on the internet; and sharing globally

    Chanelle, I can really tell you are a writer ~ in one line you give us a whole paragraph’s worth. Thank you so much.

    Pam, it’s so nice to hear people giving that extra when they appreciate you. So often we take that extra for granted. Lois (who commented above) is a great advocate of letting people know when they do something well or extra; and not only let people know when you have a complaint!.Thank you for sharing.

    Yao, “Thank you” will be your success at MIT Media Lab and being a successful entrepreneur with your own company, whether here in the US or in China. I look forward to getting caught up with you on your next vacation……

    Mark, that is so appropriate….. I wonder how many of your many “teams” feel the same way and have effectively used and implemented much of what they have learned from you , but never actually taken the step to find you, and say “Thank you”

  22. Lois Geller Says:

    Thank you Caroline, for singling out each of us..and specifically mentioning what you appreciated about our comment.

    You are a special human being and these stories really made my day.

  23. Lois Geller Says:

    Thank you Caroline, for singling out each of us..and specifically mentioning what you appreciated about our comment.

    You are a special human being and these stories really made my day.

  24. Elli St.George Godfrey Says:

    What an extraordinary story! There are many times that we are given advice or a gift that changes our lives. It can feel like we don’t know what to say. Sometimes the two words “thank you” convey everything that is in our hearts.

    Caroline, your generosity and true caring is a joy and a gift. I add my thanks to the ones already shared above. You’re brilliant, wise and an inspiration!

  25. Elli St.George Godfrey Says:

    What an extraordinary story! There are many times that we are given advice or a gift that changes our lives. It can feel like we don’t know what to say. Sometimes the two words “thank you” convey everything that is in our hearts.

    Caroline, your generosity and true caring is a joy and a gift. I add my thanks to the ones already shared above. You’re brilliant, wise and an inspiration!

  26. Melissa Galt Says:

    Funny your timing as I’ve just re-adopted the thank you habit that first built my business, thank you notes. I fell out of the habit when I got “busy.” It was one my mother instilled and while she has been gone 25 years, I’d send her a thank you first for instilling in me values that last a lifetime and transform relationships.

    Next up would be my sisters whom I rarely speak with (Mom was the glue)just for being my sisters even though we are so out of touch.

    Then my father who I refer to as the contributor of DNA, haven’t spoken in 20 years, (and yes it was legit, my folks divorced when I was young). If he hadn’t contributed that DNA, I wouldn’t be here.

    Then I’d thank every ex-boyfriend for the lessons they’ve taught me and the personal development knowing them gave me (not married so there are a few.)

    And I’d write thank yous to every client, big and small for the gift of working with them. It is always an honor and privilege to serve in the transformation from the inside out of someone else.

    Thanks for a great post Caroline!

  27. Melissa Galt Says:

    Funny your timing as I’ve just re-adopted the thank you habit that first built my business, thank you notes. I fell out of the habit when I got “busy.” It was one my mother instilled and while she has been gone 25 years, I’d send her a thank you first for instilling in me values that last a lifetime and transform relationships.

    Next up would be my sisters whom I rarely speak with (Mom was the glue)just for being my sisters even though we are so out of touch.

    Then my father who I refer to as the contributor of DNA, haven’t spoken in 20 years, (and yes it was legit, my folks divorced when I was young). If he hadn’t contributed that DNA, I wouldn’t be here.

    Then I’d thank every ex-boyfriend for the lessons they’ve taught me and the personal development knowing them gave me (not married so there are a few.)

    And I’d write thank yous to every client, big and small for the gift of working with them. It is always an honor and privilege to serve in the transformation from the inside out of someone else.

    Thanks for a great post Caroline!

  28. CASUDI Says:

    Lois, and thanks for the brownies you sent me, as a thank you in exchange for some research material I passed on to you about a year ago. These brownies were not just ordinary brownies, but individually wrapped upscale designer packaged brownies. You sure know how to go the extra mile:-)

    Ellie, yes you do embarrass me. Learning to take praise is hard for some of us however it is nice to know we are so appreciated. I have to tell you the feeling is mutual and from the moment you became my 888 follower, and I responded with “I wonder if you will be as special as 888… and lucky” …. It has been a fabulous collaborative relationship. The only thing yet to come is F2F.

    Melissa, wow what a comment ~ a comment that should count for at least 5 comments! You have been an inspiration to me since shortly after I joined twitter and I discovered you. We share the “designer” hat, the “motivational” hat, interest in China, and maybe even a red hat! So let me reverse the flow and Thank you.

  29. CASUDI Says:

    Lois, and thanks for the brownies you sent me, as a thank you in exchange for some research material I passed on to you about a year ago. These brownies were not just ordinary brownies, but individually wrapped upscale designer packaged brownies. You sure know how to go the extra mile:-)

    Ellie, yes you do embarrass me. Learning to take praise is hard for some of us however it is nice to know we are so appreciated. I have to tell you the feeling is mutual and from the moment you became my 888 follower, and I responded with “I wonder if you will be as special as 888… and lucky” …. It has been a fabulous collaborative relationship. The only thing yet to come is F2F.

    Melissa, wow what a comment ~ a comment that should count for at least 5 comments! You have been an inspiration to me since shortly after I joined twitter and I discovered you. We share the “designer” hat, the “motivational” hat, interest in China, and maybe even a red hat! So let me reverse the flow and Thank you.

  30. Lee Cunningham Says:

    Caroline — You are so good about sharing your experiences with others. This “belated thank you” story is inspiring, and must have really moved you after so many years. And what a nice person she was to write such a lovely letter.

  31. Lee Cunningham Says:

    Caroline — You are so good about sharing your experiences with others. This “belated thank you” story is inspiring, and must have really moved you after so many years. And what a nice person she was to write such a lovely letter.

  32. Janet Callaway Says:

    Caroline, aloha. What a spectacular story. Thank you so much for sharing it so that I can do the same. It is never too late to say thank you or to acknowledge someone. One of the things that I appreciate about our chats is getting to know such remarkable people from around the world.

    Thank you, Caroline, for giving of yourself and enriching my life. Judy, it was your tweet that let me know that Caroline had posted something I needed to read. Best wishes for a glorious weekend. Aloha. Janet

  33. Janet Callaway Says:

    Caroline, aloha. What a spectacular story. Thank you so much for sharing it so that I can do the same. It is never too late to say thank you or to acknowledge someone. One of the things that I appreciate about our chats is getting to know such remarkable people from around the world.

    Thank you, Caroline, for giving of yourself and enriching my life. Judy, it was your tweet that let me know that Caroline had posted something I needed to read. Best wishes for a glorious weekend. Aloha. Janet

  34. Judy Gombita Says:

    Thank you for this wonderful post, Caroline! I’m a firm believer in taking the time to thank individuals for special acts (large and even small), in particular in a format that can be saved, remembered and shared.

    My comment is going to take a two-fold route.

    1. A special exchange of thank you’s from my past.
    2. What your post is inspiring me to do in future.

    1. In the summer of 1996 a good friend and I made plans to go away for an extended weekend to Philadelphia, primarily to take in the blockbuster Cezanne exhibit at the art gallery. The tickets were ordered (well in advance) and a B&B located relatively near to the art gallery was booked (through a consortium service).

    Alas, fewer than two weeks before our getaway, my friend’s mother died (following long-term health problems). My friend was physically and emotionally drained and felt it was too soon to be absent from the rest of her grieving family. (Happily, the airline gave her a credit for that expense.)

    Although at that point in life I had travelled alone once before (to Wales, during a visit to another friend on a working stay in London, England), I was not only saddened that I wouldn’t have my friend as a travel companion, but I was also somewhat nervous about going to Philadelphia alone. (The first time was as a child, with my parents and siblings.)

    The B&B booked was a lovely historic town home, it was in a good part of Philadelphia…but just barely (a fact commented on by my lovely, older taxi driver, who was originally concerned about the address). The B&B was owned by a couple named Richard and Barbara. From the moment I entered through their door, they took me under their wing. They were sorry that they couldn’t charge me the (cheaper) single rate, but all of the financials were handled by the central consortium. It didn’t matter, because all of the personal attention and care I got more than made up for the dollar difference.

    What did they do? Besides taking an avid interest in my background and reasons for coming to Philadelphia, they:

    • Drove me to several locations.
    • Offered me a much-coveted ticket to the huge annual food show at the convention centre. (The samples of new foods and expensive items were not to be believed!)
    • Invited me, each late afternoon, to join them for cocktails and nibbles on their private patio, where they asked questions about how I’d spent my day.
    • Drew me maps and offered suggestions for things to see and do (including what parts of the city were safe and which were not).

    The long and short of it was that they made travelling alone to a strange city as palatable as possible. When I was home I wrote a heartfelt thank-you note to them for B&B warmth and hospitality so far above the norm.

    You know what? I received a thank-you note in return! This meant so much to me that I’ve saved it over the years. I dug around and found it, and will share it here. (I can’t remember the exact circumstances, but I think I was halfway to the airport before I realized that I still had my B&B key in my purse. The driver obliged my drop-off. I’m thinking there probably wasn’t anyone else in the airport van….)

    “July 1, 1996

    Dear Judy,

    We felt terrible that you had to return – in the van – to put the key in our mail slot.

    Judy – you are so considerate – you could have dropped it in the mail.

    We loved your note – and we believe good things will always come your way – because you are special – in every way.

    Take care – be well – and we hope we meet you again!”

    Fondly,
    Richard and Barbara D.”

    For years I recommended to people that if they needed a place to stay in Philadelphia that I couldn’t think of better hosts than Richard and Barbara.

    2. What your post has inspired me to do is to write the one thank-you note that I meant to, but never did, regarding my visit to Australia in November and December of 2008. (I did write thank-you notes to my Sydney host, his friend who hosted us for a boating weekend, a Sydney contact who toured me all over the place and was my main adviser regarding all things Australian, my Cairns’ hosts—met on the tour of Tasmania—and an online friend who became my Melbourne guide.)

    The note that was supposed to be written was to a gentleman also met on the Tasmania tour. We were visiting a gift shop for an opal mine, and I helped him pick out a lovely set of necklace and earrings for his wife (to be a surprise). I had selected a pair of earrings for myself. We were paying at about the same time, and the gent insisted that he was buying my earrings in addition to his wife’s gift. (They weren’t expensive, but neither were they cheap.) It was another occasion when I was blown away by incredible generosity of an individual who was a virtual stranger.

    It’s bothered me that I never wrote the thank-you note. Now, thanks to your post, I am going to do it. So thank you for the inspiration! You’re right, it’s definitely not too late….

  35. Judy Gombita Says:

    Thank you for this wonderful post, Caroline! I’m a firm believer in taking the time to thank individuals for special acts (large and even small), in particular in a format that can be saved, remembered and shared.

    My comment is going to take a two-fold route.

    1. A special exchange of thank you’s from my past.
    2. What your post is inspiring me to do in future.

    1. In the summer of 1996 a good friend and I made plans to go away for an extended weekend to Philadelphia, primarily to take in the blockbuster Cezanne exhibit at the art gallery. The tickets were ordered (well in advance) and a B&B located relatively near to the art gallery was booked (through a consortium service).

    Alas, fewer than two weeks before our getaway, my friend’s mother died (following long-term health problems). My friend was physically and emotionally drained and felt it was too soon to be absent from the rest of her grieving family. (Happily, the airline gave her a credit for that expense.)

    Although at that point in life I had travelled alone once before (to Wales, during a visit to another friend on a working stay in London, England), I was not only saddened that I wouldn’t have my friend as a travel companion, but I was also somewhat nervous about going to Philadelphia alone. (The first time was as a child, with my parents and siblings.)

    The B&B booked was a lovely historic town home, it was in a good part of Philadelphia…but just barely (a fact commented on by my lovely, older taxi driver, who was originally concerned about the address). The B&B was owned by a couple named Richard and Barbara. From the moment I entered through their door, they took me under their wing. They were sorry that they couldn’t charge me the (cheaper) single rate, but all of the financials were handled by the central consortium. It didn’t matter, because all of the personal attention and care I got more than made up for the dollar difference.

    What did they do? Besides taking an avid interest in my background and reasons for coming to Philadelphia, they:

    • Drove me to several locations.
    • Offered me a much-coveted ticket to the huge annual food show at the convention centre. (The samples of new foods and expensive items were not to be believed!)
    • Invited me, each late afternoon, to join them for cocktails and nibbles on their private patio, where they asked questions about how I’d spent my day.
    • Drew me maps and offered suggestions for things to see and do (including what parts of the city were safe and which were not).

    The long and short of it was that they made travelling alone to a strange city as palatable as possible. When I was home I wrote a heartfelt thank-you note to them for B&B warmth and hospitality so far above the norm.

    You know what? I received a thank-you note in return! This meant so much to me that I’ve saved it over the years. I dug around and found it, and will share it here. (I can’t remember the exact circumstances, but I think I was halfway to the airport before I realized that I still had my B&B key in my purse. The driver obliged my drop-off. I’m thinking there probably wasn’t anyone else in the airport van….)

    “July 1, 1996

    Dear Judy,

    We felt terrible that you had to return – in the van – to put the key in our mail slot.

    Judy – you are so considerate – you could have dropped it in the mail.

    We loved your note – and we believe good things will always come your way – because you are special – in every way.

    Take care – be well – and we hope we meet you again!”

    Fondly,
    Richard and Barbara D.”

    For years I recommended to people that if they needed a place to stay in Philadelphia that I couldn’t think of better hosts than Richard and Barbara.

    2. What your post has inspired me to do is to write the one thank-you note that I meant to, but never did, regarding my visit to Australia in November and December of 2008. (I did write thank-you notes to my Sydney host, his friend who hosted us for a boating weekend, a Sydney contact who toured me all over the place and was my main adviser regarding all things Australian, my Cairns’ hosts—met on the tour of Tasmania—and an online friend who became my Melbourne guide.)

    The note that was supposed to be written was to a gentleman also met on the Tasmania tour. We were visiting a gift shop for an opal mine, and I helped him pick out a lovely set of necklace and earrings for his wife (to be a surprise). I had selected a pair of earrings for myself. We were paying at about the same time, and the gent insisted that he was buying my earrings in addition to his wife’s gift. (They weren’t expensive, but neither were they cheap.) It was another occasion when I was blown away by incredible generosity of an individual who was a virtual stranger.

    It’s bothered me that I never wrote the thank-you note. Now, thanks to your post, I am going to do it. So thank you for the inspiration! You’re right, it’s definitely not too late….

  36. CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) Says:

    Lee, or rather Madame Butterfly it’s amazing you commenting on my blog. I should be thanking you for having brought 3 fabulous companions directly into into my life (& 2 others indirectly) and as you know I mentioned you in my post “All’s well….” if anyone wants to know why “Madame Butterfly” ? ~ One day I’ll have to do a post all about your entrepreneurial focus and invention, meanwhile please take care of yourself.

    Janet, thanks for your support and enthusiasm… yes, the twitter chats have been the greatest part of my twitter experience and it never ceases to amaze me how the simple “tweet” can ripple around the globe, touching so many, and creating meaningful relationships. Maybe I am thinking along these lines as I just read Mark Schaefer’s book “The Tao of twitter” ……. which seems to explain it all so simply. I look forward to chatting with you often.

    Judy, I am overwhelmed by your sharing. Thanks so much for your contribution. What is interesting is your one travel related story and the comment by Cathy above, and several I heard from friends on the phone, have shown me that holiday kindness or extra customer service on vacation, often go un-thanked. So thinking this through, there must be all good intentions to thank, yet when one gets home, back to one’s everyday life of dealing with the immediate problems often caused by having been away :-) it just slips ones mind. When one has been back for a day, a holiday seems like many years ago. I know in future I am going to get the “Thank you” written on my travels home.

  37. CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) Says:

    Lee, or rather Madame Butterfly it’s amazing you commenting on my blog. I should be thanking you for having brought 3 fabulous companions directly into into my life (& 2 others indirectly) and as you know I mentioned you in my post “All’s well….” if anyone wants to know why “Madame Butterfly” ? ~ One day I’ll have to do a post all about your entrepreneurial focus and invention, meanwhile please take care of yourself.

    Janet, thanks for your support and enthusiasm… yes, the twitter chats have been the greatest part of my twitter experience and it never ceases to amaze me how the simple “tweet” can ripple around the globe, touching so many, and creating meaningful relationships. Maybe I am thinking along these lines as I just read Mark Schaefer’s book “The Tao of twitter” ……. which seems to explain it all so simply. I look forward to chatting with you often.

    Judy, I am overwhelmed by your sharing. Thanks so much for your contribution. What is interesting is your one travel related story and the comment by Cathy above, and several I heard from friends on the phone, have shown me that holiday kindness or extra customer service on vacation, often go un-thanked. So thinking this through, there must be all good intentions to thank, yet when one gets home, back to one’s everyday life of dealing with the immediate problems often caused by having been away :-) it just slips ones mind. When one has been back for a day, a holiday seems like many years ago. I know in future I am going to get the “Thank you” written on my travels home.

Leave a Reply

CommentLuv badge